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Washington State Forest Owners’ Online Field Day – October 24th

Washington State Forest Owners’ Online Field Day

Keep your forested property healthy and productive

Forests in Washington State are facing unprecedented challenges and increasing tree mortality. WSU Extension is presenting the 2020 Washington Forest Owners’ Online Field Day to help you meet those challenges, restore healthy forest conditions, and achieve your goals for your property. The Online Field Day will feature over a dozen different outdoor workshops specifically for people with forested property in Washington State.

Feeling cooped up inside this fall? Come learn about current forest health issues, drought and climate impacts, fire risk reduction, mushrooms, wildlife, and much more in a virtual out-in-the-woods setting with local experts.   See the complete list of workshop topics for more details.

For registration and more information, visit the Field Day page.

Webinar: Wildfires in Western Washington, A Different Animal

There is no shortage of news coverage, research, publications, and educational programming available to address the issue of wildfires in the dry forests of eastern Washington and the rest of the interior Pacific Northwest.  These areas have been hit hard by wildfires due to decades of fire suppression and require a massive forest restoration effort to reduce fuel loads.  But what about fires in the wet forests of western Washington?  How do wildfire behavior and forest fire ecology differ in this region? How does a changing climate impact the risk of catastrophic fires and what does this mean for how we manage forests and protect homes here?

Many believe that fire is simply not a concern west of the Cascades.  While it’s true that greater rainfall makes these forests more fire-resilient, it also inherently means greater fuel loads will be available when fires do occur.  As the climate continues to change and we experience hotter summers and longer dry periods, catastrophic wildfires may become a more pressing concern on the west side. While this is an alarming thought, learning more about how these fires behave is the first step to being prepared.

Log in to this webinar to hear Daniel Donato (WADNR/UW) discuss the current science on western Washington wildfires followed by Ashley Blazina (WADNR), who will talk about the best practices for protecting your home.

When and Where

Tuesday, June 30 (6-8PM)

This seminar will be offered via a live, interactive webinar. A high-speed internet connection is needed. Dial-up will not work. You can access the webinar with your computer or mobile device.

IMPORTANT:  Due to increased security, you must have your own Zoom account to participate. You can easily create a free Zoom account if you do not already have one. You must have your Zoom account set up and be registered for the webinar at least two hours before the webinar start time.

If you cannot attend the webinar, a recording will be available afterwards.  You are welcome to register if you cannot attend to receive an email notification when the recording is available or check back at this website the week following the webinar.

Cost and Registration

There is no cost to this webinar.  Pre-registering is required and can be done online.

Accommodations and Acknowledgements

Extension programs and employment are available to all without discrimination. Evidence of noncompliance may be reported through your local Extension office. Reasonable accommodations will be made for persons with disabilities and special needs who contact Patrick Shults at 360-740-1213 or patrick.shults@wsu.edu at least two weeks prior to the event.

Forest Farming: Log-Grown Mushroom Webinar

mushroom log fieldmushroom logs stackedlogs soaking in water

View the recording of this webinar on Youtube

Click here to download a PDF of the presentation slides

Interested in Learning How to Grow Specialty Mushrooms?

Forest farming specialty mushrooms like shiitake, lions mane, oysters, and wine caps present a unique opportunity for farm and forest owners to diversify production and put something new on the dinner table.   Today, much of the specialty mushroom market is supplied by wild-foraged products but log-grown operations can provide reliable harvests on minimal acreage while retaining it’s value as a sustainable, forest-grown product.  Whether your interest is as a producer or a hobbyist, this webinar will cover the basics of log-grown mushroom operations.

What’s Covered

The webinar will walk you through the process of properly starting mushroom logs and tips for managing larger operations.   Discussions will cover all the elements of a log-grown mushroom operation, with an emphasis on shiitake, including:

  • Selecting and harvesting logs
  • Start-up costs
  • Equipment and material options
  • Selecting mushroom species and strain

  • Inoculation process
  • Moisture management
  • Dealing with contaminating fungi
  • Forcing and harvesting

When and Where

Tuesday, April 14th (4PM-6PM)

This course will be offered via a live, interactive webinar. A high-speed internet connection is needed. Dial-up will not work. You can access the webinars with your computer or mobile device. Access instructions will be provided prior to the class.

Cost and Registration

There is no cost.  The webinar platform does have limited capacity so pre-registering is required and can be done online via Eventbrite.   Registration is open until noon on April 14th.

Accommodations and Acknowledgements

This workshop is funded as a part of a WSU BIOAg grant.

Extension programs and employment are available to all without discrimination. Evidence of noncompliance may be reported through your local Extension office. Reasonable accommodations will be made for persons with disabilities and special needs who contact Patrick Shults at 360-740-1213 or patrick.shults@wsu.edu at least two weeks prior to the event.

Forest Health Webinar – November 14th

Forest Stewardship Webinars

Give us 50 minutes, we’ll teach you something

We offer periodic live webinars on various forest stewardship topics. The webinars are free, but space is limited and pre-registration is required. Below are our upcoming webinars.

Current Forest Health Issues in Western WA

By popular demand, we are reprising this webinar:
Dead and dying trees have proliferated western Washington, especially western redcedars, causing concern for many property owners. Washington State University (WSU) Extension Forestry is offering this free webinar to explain why so many trees are dying right now and what property owners can do. Learn what makes forests healthy or unhealthy and how to recognize when there’s a problem on your property. Topics include insects, diseases, and drought, including their environmental roles and the important interactions between them. Learn about what property owners should do (and not do) to increase tree resilience and mitigate impacts. The seminar will be taught by Kevin Zobrist, professor of forestry at WSU and author of the book Native Trees of Western Washington. This is a condensed version of our in-person seminars. This webinar is geared toward property owners.

When: Thursday, November 14th, 12:05 to 12:55 p.m. or 7:05 to 7:55 p.m.

Register for the 12:05 p.m. forest health webinar
Register for the 7:05 p.m. forest health webinar

Acknowledgements and Accommodations

This program is made possible in part by funding support from Washington State University, Island County, King County, King Conservation District, Puyallup Watershed Initiative, San Juan County, San Juan Islands Conservation District, Skagit County, Snohomish County, and Snohomish Conservation District.

Extension programs and employment are available to all without discrimination. Evidence of noncompliance may be reported through your local Extension office. Reasonable accommodations will be made for persons with disabilities and special needs who contact Brendan Whyte at 425-357-6023 or brendan.whyte@wsu.edu at least two weeks prior to the event.

Forest health, fire, and water seminar – November 19th in Monroe (new date)

What’s happening to our forests?

Increasing tree mortality and fire risk are serious threats to health and safety, water quality, and quality of life in Snohomish County. Dead and dying trees have proliferated throughout the county, especially with cedars, hemlocks, and maples. Wildfire and smoke are growing concerns. Could what happened in California happen here? Join local forest experts from UW and WSU at a free seminar to learn about what’s happening, why it’s happening, what it means for your property and your watershed, and what you should and should not be doing.

Details and Registration

Admission is free, and no registration is necessary.

New date and time: the seminar will be Tuesday, November 19th, from 5:45 p.m. – 7:45 p.m. at the Monroe Library, 1070 Village Way, Monroe, WA 98272.

For more information contact Brendan Whyte, WSU Extension Forestry, or call 425-357-6023.

Acknowledgements and Accommodations

This program is made possible in part by funding from Washington State University and Snohomish County Surface Water Management. In-kind support provided by Sno-Isle Libraries.

Extension programs and employment are available to all without discrimination. Evidence of noncompliance may be reported through your local Extension office. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication or program information or reasonable accommodation need to contact Brendan Whyte at WSU Extension Forestry or call 425-357-6023 at least two weeks prior to the event.

Forest health and fire risk seminar – December 10th in North Bend

What’s happening to our forests?

Increasing tree mortality and fire risk are serious threats to health and safety, water quality, and quality of life in King County. Dead and dying trees have proliferated throughout the county, especially with cedars, hemlocks, and maples. Wildfire and smoke are growing concerns. Could what happened in California happen here? Join local forest experts from WSU and KCD at a free seminar to learn about what’s happening, why it’s happening, what it means for your property, and what you should and should not be doing.

Details and Registration

Admission is free, and no registration is necessary.

The seminar will be Tuesday, December 10th, from 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. at the North Bend Library, 115 E 4th St, North Bend, WA 98045.

For more information contact Noelle Hart, WSU Extension Forestry, or call 206-263-1128.

Acknowledgements and Accommodations

This program is made possible in part by funding from Washington State University and King County DNRP. In-kind support provided by King Conservation District and the King County Library System.

Extension programs and employment are available to all without discrimination. Evidence of noncompliance may be reported through your local Extension office. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication or program information or reasonable accommodation need to contact Noelle Hart at WSU Extension Forestry or call 206-263-1128 at least two weeks prior to the event.

Forest health and fire risk seminar – December 12th in Carnation

What’s happening to our forests?

Increasing tree mortality and fire risk are serious threats to health and safety, water quality, and quality of life in King County. Dead and dying trees have proliferated throughout the county, especially with cedars, hemlocks, and maples. Wildfire and smoke are growing concerns. Could what happened in California happen here? Join local forest experts from WSU and KCD at a free seminar to learn about what’s happening, why it’s happening, what it means for your property, and what you should and should not be doing.

Details and Registration

Admission is free, and no registration is necessary.

The seminar will be Thursday, December 12th, from 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. at the Carnation Library, 4804 Tolt Ave, Carnation, WA 98014.

For more information contact Noelle Hart, WSU Extension Forestry, or call 206-263-1128.

Acknowledgements and Accommodations

This program is made possible in part by funding from Washington State University and King County DNRP. In-kind support provided by King Conservation District and the King County Library System.

Extension programs and employment are available to all without discrimination. Evidence of noncompliance may be reported through your local Extension office. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication or program information or reasonable accommodation need to contact Noelle Hart at WSU Extension Forestry or call 206-263-1128 at least two weeks prior to the event.

Forest health and fire risk seminar – December 17th in Issaquah

What’s happening with our forests?

Increasing tree mortality and fire risk are serious threats to health and safety, water quality, and quality of life in King County. Dead and dying trees have proliferated throughout the county, especially with cedars, hemlocks, and maples. Wildfire and smoke are growing concerns. Could what happened in California happen here? Join local forest experts from WSU and KCD at a free seminar to learn about what’s happening, why it’s happening, what it means for your property, and what you should and should not be doing.

Details and Registration

Admission is free, and no registration is necessary.

The seminar will be Tuesday, December 17th, from 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. at the Issaquah Library, 10 W Sunset Way, Issaquah, WA 98027.

For more information contact Noelle Hart, WSU Extension Forestry, or call 206-263-1128.

Acknowledgements and Accommodations

This program is made possible in part by funding from Washington State University and King County DNRP. In-kind support provided by King Conservation District and the King County Library System.

Extension programs and employment are available to all without discrimination. Evidence of noncompliance may be reported through your local Extension office. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication or program information or reasonable accommodation need to contact Noelle Hart at WSU Extension Forestry or call 206-263-1128 at least two weeks prior to the event.

Bigleaf Maple Syrup Workshop – November 9th in Concrete

A delicious hobby for forest property owners

A common misconception is that our native bigleaf maple is not suitable for syrup production. On the contrary–bigleaf maple on the West Coast produces an exquisite syrup that rivals anything the eastern U.S. or Canada have to offer. Imagine a rich, buttery maple flavor with a hint of vanilla.

 

Details and Registration